Back to the lawn
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Facts & Figures

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Building architects: Hartman-Cox
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Exterior landscape architects: Olin Partnership
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Courtyard landscape architects: Nelson Byrd Woltz
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Gross square footage: 156,370
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Case classrooms: 10
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Flat-floor seminar classroom: 1
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Classrooms on the Lawn (Shared with the University) 2
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M.S. in MIT classroom: 1
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Auditorium classroom: 1
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Faculty seminar room: 1
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IT labs: 4
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Student club facility: 1
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Reading/dining facility: 1
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Faculty and staff offices: 100+
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Group study rooms: 15
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Courtyard terrace gardens:

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Two courtyard terrace gardens, designed by Nelson Byrd Woltz, take their inspiration from the University Grounds and pavilion gardens. Relying on native plants and local building materials, the courtyard space is also designed to enhance teaching, learning, and social interaction.

The new academic complex features the University’s first environmentally “green” roof, which will reduce the temperature and heat load on the roof of the building beneath plant trays of sedum. The green roof, designed by Nelson Byrd Woltz, will also protect the roof membrane and increase its longevity by shielding it from the destructive effects of the sun’s ultraviolet rays.

A reading room serves both as a great place to study and an ideal place for hosting special events.

Faculty and staff moved into Rouss and Robertson Halls in early 2008. Click here for a timeline.


 

Why has the McIntire School moved from Monroe Hall?
Very simply, in addition to increasing pressure to compete with our peer institutions for top students and faculty, more space was needed to deliver our world-class business programs. To offer the best in business education, schools require state-of-the-art classrooms and labs and high levels of technology, including an environment that simulates the business world. Monroe Hall did not allow for further expansion of our programs and therefore inhibited our ability to offer more programs to a wider group of students. Rouss & Robertson Halls provide an environment to allow McIntire to continue to compete at the very top of the business school rankings.

Why the Lawn?
McIntire’s home in Monroe Hall offered the School the second-best location on Grounds. The only better location? The Lawn. The move has given McIntire a home on the most important piece of real estate in American higher education and places the School in proximity to the College. That’s especially important because, as the Commerce School is integrated into the Academical Village, the new complex will facilitate McIntire’s exciting collaboration with the University’s College of Arts & Sciences. This collaboration includes a number of existing and planned ventures, including the creation of interdisciplinary courses and programs. The plan will allow the College and the Commerce School to strengthen the academic and programmatic links between them and to better serve their undergraduate and graduate students. (Rouss Hall was the home of the McIntire School from 1955 to 1975. The School moved to Monroe Hall in 1975 and completed a major addition in 1987. Returning to Rouss Hall makes the naming of the capital campaign as “Back to the Lawn” particularly appropriate within this historical context.)

What will happen to Monroe Hall now that the McIntire School has vacated?
Monroe Hall will be returned to the College of Arts & Sciences for its departments. Final assignment of space in Monroe has not yet been determined.

How can I become involved in this historic endeavor?
The new academic complex is being built substantially through private sources, and fundraising continues, with significant naming opportunities for new donors and friends of the School still available. Visit the Web site and become a sponsor, and tell your parents and friends about the project and the School. Many different levels of support are needed for this project – from small pieces of structure to entire classrooms. Contact Assistant Dean for Development Katie Whittier at 434-924-3394 or whittier@virginia.edu; she will work with you regardless of the size of your gift or level of support.

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